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André Thomkins
Lackskin on paper, 1961–1964
165 x 195 cm
André Thomkins
Lackskin on paper, 1961–1964
165,5 x 200,5 cm
André Thomkins
Lackskin on paper, 1961–1964
170 x 200 cm
André Thomkins
Lackskin on paper, 1961–1964
138 x 196 cm

André Thomkins: Lackskins (1961–1964)
September/October 2019

Influenced by Dada and Surrealism, André Thomkins (Luzern 1930 – Berlin 1985), ranks as one of the most important Swiss artist of the 20th century. After moving to Germany in 1952, he taught from 1971–74 at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf and worked in Berlin from 1982 as part of a DAAD fellowship programme.

In the late 1950s, Thomkins developed the technique of the ›Lackskin‹ (paint-skin), which involved pictures floating on water. The technique combined momentary chance – in the droplets of paint landing on water – with a precise arrangement of forms. The resulting image remains variable for many hours until it is finally absorbed onto a sheet of paper placed on the water. Thomkins combined controlled intervention with spontaneous, gestural form of ›painting‹ that was reminiscent of the automatism of the Surrealists and a reference to the Abstract Expressionism and Action Painting of the 1960s.